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Linda H. Blair President and Chief Executive Officer

Our electricity transmission systems cross all types of urban, suburban and rural environments, so it’s important that we co-exist with these surroundings as good stewards of the land, water and air.

Managing the high-voltage power grid across several states carries far-ranging environmental responsibility. In fact, the modern utility is required to think beyond the reliable delivery of power to consider how its infrastructure works in harmony with the environment.

Since our electricity transmission systems cross all types of urban, suburban and rural environments, it’s important that we co-exist with these surroundings as good stewards of the land, water and air. This ethic begins in our workplaces and extends to building, operating and maintaining the grid. These systems include poles, towers, power lines and substations incorporated into the nation’s electric infrastructure.

Employees as Catalysts: Environmental stewardship starts at home for ITC. Within the company’s facilities, our Green Team employee volunteer group helps implement environmentally friendly practices. The team reviews everything from recycling programs to reducing energy consumption in our buildings with a goal of achieving zero landfill waste.

Planning and Constructing Transmission: When planning transmission projects, we include environmental assessments and apply best practices for wetlands, threatened and endangered species, and other sensitive habitats. By including these factors at the front end in a transmission line route analysis, we can adjust the placement or timing of construction to avoid or limit the environmental impact.

Operating and Maintaining Transmission: Responsible management of the natural space under and around transmission corridors accomplishes more than the main objective of maintaining safe and reliable electric service: This work results in diverse, stable, natural greenways where grasses, wildflowers and low-growing shrubs thrive with less environmental disturbance. Foresters and other trained field staff inspect ITC’s corridors to identify both appropriate and incompatible species on a site-by-site basis and recommend suitable management methods in the greenways.

Sharing Success with Communities: ITC has accumulated 14 environmental site certifications from the Wildlife Habitat Council. This internationally recognized organization showcases conservation efforts by corporations that involve management, employees and the community to conserve and restore wildlife habitats on corporate lands, often in close proximity to the communities we serve.

Electric utilities are charged with keeping the lights on, but we can do more. Few companies and industries operate as close to the landscape as we utilities do, so this industry is ideally positioned to partner and contribute to environmental sustainability — while still keeping the power flowing.