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Steven R. Swartz President and CEO

Hearst believes that sustainability must be enterprising, ongoing and broadly defined. This notion encompasses our print products, digital businesses, Hearst Tower global headquarters, and the health and well-being of our 20,000 employees.

As one of the world’s largest diversified media, information and services companies, Hearst believes that sustainability must be enterprising, ongoing and broadly defined. This notion encompasses our print products, Hearst Tower global headquarters, and the health and well-being of our 20,000 employees.

Hearst Tower is our most visible example of sustainability. It was the first skyscraper to rise in New York after 9/11 and is a symbol of the city’s resilience and resourcefulness. Designed by renowned architect Norman Foster, it was the city’s first new commercial building to earn Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council when it opened in 2006. In 2012, and again in 2016, it achieved LEED Platinum status for Existing Buildings.

Lord Foster’s design maximizes sustainability. An efficient diagrid system that uses four-story triangles on the façade requires about 2,000 tons less structural steel than a conventional building. Building on the original 1928 six-story base designed by Joseph Urban, the Tower realizes the original vision of company founder William Randolph Hearst.

Other sustainable features include:

  • Rainwater is collected and stored in a 14,000-gallon basement reclamation tank; the water replaces that which is lost to evaporation, irrigates vegetation, and humidifies and chills the Tower’s 10-story atrium via Icefall, a waterfall structure by artist Jamie Carpenter.

  • Hearst follows strict procedures to dispose of electronic waste (obsolete computers, printing/toner cartridges and light bulbs) by contracting with recycling services.

  • In 2016, 89 percent of Hearst’s total waste (excluding electronics and grease) was recycled.

Our magazines and newspapers start with sustainable forestry. In 2004, Hearst initiated the Hearst Sustainable Forestry Initiative to help ensure that paper for its publications is being sourced from forests that are being sustainably managed. To verify this, we have set a goal that 80 percent of the paper we consume comes from forests that are certified sustainable by one of the accredited third-party audited standards. We have been continuously at or close to this target for more than 10 years.

We are also deeply invested in recycling, and we are committed to educating consumers to recycle magazines, too — about 80 percent of theirs now end up in landfills. We actively support the Association of Magazine Media’s “Please Recycle” campaign.

Hearst is a company grounded in history that always looks forward. Here, sustainability is an unwavering, ongoing core value.